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Registration still open: "Talking to Authors in a World of Elsevier Takedowns and Open Access Mandates"

posted Mar 6, 2014, 11:41 AM by Lars Hagelin

There are only two weeks until the "Talking to Authors in a World of Elsevier Takedowns and Open Access Mandates," a webinar led by Laura Quilter of U-Mass Amherst!

WEBINAR: "Talking to Authors in a World of Elsevier Takedowns and Open Access Mandates"
DATE / TIME: March 19, 2014 -- 3pm ET
REGISTER: http://bit.ly/1oHE7Sz

WEBINAR DESCRIPTION: Academic authors face tough challenges in deciding where and how to publish. Publishers are increasingly aggressive about enforcing copyrights -- as evidenced by Elsevier's flurry of copyright "takedown" notices in December, and the ongoing "ereserves" litigation against Georgia State University. Funders and employers (universities) are moving ahead with efforts to ensure widespread open access to work they fund and support. Professional societies are at a loss of how best to advise their members, and the junior faculty and graduate students. Into this stew of confusion, throw in a few dashes of "altmetrics", "MOOCs", critiques of peer review, and the usual travails of funding and competition for scarce jobs, and it's no wonder that we librarians have a tough time getting faculty to focus on negotiating their author agreements.

So where is all this going? And how can librarians talk to our campus authors -- our faculty, grad students, and other authors -- about their best interests, both short-term and long-term? Who are the collaborators on campus that we could be working with to help scholarship make this transition? What kinds of interventions can we make that will be helpful? Laura Quilter, copyright attorney and librarian, will discuss the legal import of Elsevier's takedowns and the GSU case, as well as strategies and approaches for librarians consulting with faculty and their campuses.

This is the fourth in a series of webinars focusing on open access, copyright, and fair use that are co-sponsored by ASERL, Boston Library Consortium, Greater Western Library Alliance, Triangle Research Libraries Network, and Washington Research Library Consortium. 

Registration Now Open for "Talking to Authors in a World of Elsevier Takedowns and Open Access Mandates"

posted Feb 20, 2014, 9:55 AM by Lars Hagelin

The next installment in the on-going copyright and fair use series, Talking to Authors in a World of Elsevier Takedowns and Open Access Mandates, will be held Wednesday, March 19, 2014, 3:00 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time.

Program Description:

Academic authors face tough challenges in deciding where and how to publish. Publishers are increasingly aggressive about enforcing copyrights -- as evidenced by Elsevier's flurry of copyright "takedown" notices in December, and the ongoing "ereserves" litigation against Georgia State University. Funders and employers (universities) are moving ahead with efforts to ensure widespread open access to work they fund and support. Professional societies are at a loss of how best to advise their members, and the junior faculty and graduate students. Into this stew of confusion, throw in a few dashes of "altmetrics", "MOOCs", critiques of peer review, and the usual travails of funding and competition for scarce jobs, and it's no wonder that we librarians have a tough time getting faculty to focus on negotiating their author agreements.

So where is all this going? And how can librarians talk to our campus authors -- our faculty, grad students, and other authors -- about their best interests, both short-term and long-term? Who are the collaborators on campus that we could be working with to help scholarship make this transition? What kinds of interventions can we make that will be helpful?

Laura Quilter, copyright attorney and librarian, will discuss the legal import of Elsevier's takedowns and the GSU case, as well as strategies and approaches for librarians consulting with faculty and their campuses.

Olivia Madison to Receive the 2014 Ross Atkinson Lifetime Achievement Award

posted Feb 3, 2014, 8:49 AM by Lars Hagelin

Olivia Madison, Professor & Dean of the Library Administration at Iowa State University, has been named as the recipient of the 2014 Ross Atkinson Lifetime Achievement Award.

The Ross Atkinson Lifetime Achievement Award Jury is pleased to name Olivia Madison, Dean of the Library at Iowa State University as the recipient of the 2014 Ross Atkinson Lifetime Achievement award. The award, accompanied by a $3,000 check sponsored by EBSCO, will be presented at the ALCTS Annual Award Ceremony on Saturday, June 28, 2014 from 5:30-7:00 PM.

Olivia's leadership, scholarship and service to ALCTS exemplify the purpose and intent of this prestigious award. For more than 35 years, Olivia has provided leadership at many levels within ALCTS and ALA. Her roles have included Chair of CC:DA, Chair of the ALCTS Budget and Finance Committee, and most recently, Chair of the ALCTS Advocacy and Policy Committee. Olivia served as ALCTS President in 2003 and was elected to ALA Council as a Councilor-at-Large in 2013. She has written and presented extensively, editing three books, authoring more than 25 journal articles, and presenting papers at professional meetings. Her scholarship reflects engagement in the fields of cataloging, technical services, and librarianship as a whole. Olivia's research efforts have been collaborative, and of great impact. Her signal work is participation in the development of the bibliographic data model presented in IFLA's Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records (FRBR). This in turn became the impetus for the Bibliographic Framework Transition Initiative, the development study to create a post-MARC environment for the communication of bibliographic data for libraries and other cultural institutions. Olivia's research is shaping how library data will be recorded, presented, and stored in the future. In 2010, she was honored by her colleagues for her contributions to the profession with one of ALCTS' most prestigious awards, the Margaret Mann Citation for outstanding achievement in cataloging or classification. She is an invited member of Phi Kappa Phi, the nation's oldest and largest honor society for all academic disciplines.

During her distinguished career Olivia Madison has addressed many of the major issues at the heart of ALCTS and indeed, the profession.

Congratulations to Olivia!!



[From post by Helen Reed on ALCTSLEADERS, on behalf of the Ross Atkinson Lifetime Achievement Award Jury]

Helen I. Reed, Dean of University Libraries and Chair, Ross Atkinson Lifetime Achievement Award Jury
University of Northern Colorado
Campus Box 48
Greeley, CO 80639
(970) 351-2601
helen.reed@unco.edu

GWLA and Springer Launch eBooks Interlibrary Loan Pilot with Occam’s Reader Project

posted Jan 31, 2014, 10:18 AM by Lars Hagelin   [ updated Jan 31, 2014, 10:22 AM ]

PRESS RELEASE
GWLA and Springer Launch eBooks Interlibrary Loan Pilot with Occam’s Reader Project


The Occam’s Reader Project is a partnership between Texas Tech University, the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa and GWLA

The Occam’s Reader Project – comprised of Texas Tech University, the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa, and the Greater Western Library Alliance (GWLA) – and Springer, are pleased to announce that they have entered into an agreement to run a pilot program with GWLA’s 33 members, focused on eBook interlibrary loans (ILL). This is the first major collaboration of its kind between academic libraries and a major publisher. The year-long project could revolutionize the way libraries share books in a digital world.

At the center of the project lies Occam’s Reader, new software developed by the Design & Development Team at Texas Tech University Libraries and the Web Interface Development Team at the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa Libraries, in collaboration with Greater Western Library Alliance (GWLA). Occam’s Reader creates a process for requesting, processing and delivering eBooks. ILL has always been possible under the terms of Springer eBook licenses, but previously there was no process for doing so. By integrating with the existing ILLiad framework, Occam’s Reader should make eBook ILL part of libraries’ everyday workflow.

The many features of Occam’s Reader make this a win-win situation for both GWLA members and Springer. Benefits include secure online access to borrowed books, compliance with copyright laws and licensing provisions, reporting of usage statistics and the ability to take advantage of existing Springer features, such as location- and device-agnostic access. Both eBook chapters and full eBooks from Springer are included in the pilot.

Joni Blake, Executive Director of GWLA stated, “This project is in keeping with GWLA's long tradition of being an innovation incubator, and advocating for cutting-edge technological solutions to problems facing academic libraries.”

Ryan Litsey, Texas Tech Document Delivery Librarian and Director of the Occam’s Reader Project said, “We could not be more proud of the headway that we are making with our new Occam’s Reader technology. Interlibrary loans of eBooks have long been a challenge posed to academic libraries, and we believe this new software could be the answer.”

Naomi Chow, Interlibrary Loan Librarian at University of Hawai’i at Mānoa added, “We are excited to be a development partner in this project that has the potential to change the way research libraries work with publishers. Our goal is to make Occam’s Reader the gold standard for electronic loans.”

“At Springer we are constantly trying to find new ways to add value to the content, products and services that we offer,” said Syed Hasan, President of Global Academic and Government Sales and Marketing. “It is part of our DNA to collaborate on promising initiatives like this pilot in order to help find solutions to our customers’ challenges, and we are excited for the opportunity to take part.”

Greater Western Library Alliance (www.gwla.org) is a dynamic, effective, project-oriented consortium, nationally recognized as a leader in the transformation of scholarly communication, and a facilitator in the application of new information technologies.

Springer Science+Business Media (www.springer.com) is a leading global scientific, technical and medical publisher, providing researchers in academia, scientific institutions and corporate R&D departments with quality content via innovative information products and services.

Contact:

Joni Blake | Greater Western Library Alliance | joni@gwla.org | tel.: +1 913.370.4422
Ryan Litsey | Texas Tech University | ryan.litsey@ttu.edu | tel.: +1 806.742.2239
Naomi Chow | University of Hawai’i at Mānoa | nchow@hawaii.edu | tel.: +1 808.956.5951
Alexander Brown | Springer | alexander.brown@springer.com | tel.: +1 212.620.8063 

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Registration Open for “Fair Use Without Fear in the Academy” Copyright Webinar on February 18

posted Jan 20, 2014, 10:12 AM by Joni Blake

As pedagogy and scholarship grow and change with technology, more and more of what university professors do implicates copyright. More than any other, fair use is the legal doctrine that empowers members of the academy to do their jobs without having to ask or pay for permission. 

Fair use experts Peter Jaszi and Brandon Butler from American University's Washington College of Law will describe the growth of the fair use doctrine and the ways that communities, including scholars, are taking advantage of their fair use rights to get things done.

Our next event in our multi-consortium webinar series will be “Fair Use Without Fear in the Academy” at Noon (Eastern Time) on February 18, coordinated by our friends at the Washington Research Library Consortium (WRLC).    

More details and registration can be found at http://bit.ly/1m5AMIB . The webinar is free and open to all interested members.

2nd Annual Western Science Boot Camp for Librarians-- Save the Date!!

posted Jan 10, 2014, 5:59 AM by Lars Hagelin

July 9-11, 2014: Science Boot Camp for Librarians, University of Washington, Seattle Washington

Please save the date for the second annual Western Science Boot Camp for Librarians! Science Boot Camps for Librarians are immersive 2½ day events featuring educational presentations about science. This Science Boot Camp will explore key concepts and research in engineering, environmental sciences and health sciences, all focused on the science of disaster. 

Stay tuned for further announcements at http://guides.lib.washington.edu/ScienceBootCampWest2014

Still Time to Register!-- Helping Students Make Sense of Fair Use (January 15, 2014)

posted Jan 6, 2014, 6:06 AM by Lars Hagelin

We have 145 registrants already for the upcoming installment in our Copyright Series!
Program description and a registration link are below:

WEBINAR
: Helping Students Make Sense of Fair Use 

Date: Wednesday, January 15, 2014 
Time: 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM EST 
Register via https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/737141314 
After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar. 

Program Description: 

U.S. Copyright Law grants a number of exclusive rights to copyright owners, but those rights have various limitations. One of those limitations, fair use, is both a blessing and a curse for educators. It’s a blessing because it gives us the right to use copyrighted materials without seeking permission from the copyright owner, but it can also be a curse due to misunderstandings and misinformation regarding fair use. Making matters worse is the circulation of various sets of classroom “guidelines” – on university and library websites – that have never been part of copyright legislation and are therefore, not legally binding. In fact, most classroom copyright guidelines are quite restrictive and, if followed to the letter, can erode and impair the educational mission of the University.

So if we’re confused about copyright, what about our students? How do we help them think critically about using copyrighted materials in their classroom assignments when we’re not even sure ourselves? This webinar will describe current fair use analysis and provide a framework to guide students in making sound decisions about using copyrighted material in their work.

Sue Kunda, Digital Scholarship Librarian for Oregon State University Libraries and Press, will be the lead presenter for this session.

System Requirements:
  • PC-based attendees: Required: Windows® 8, 7, Vista, XP or 2003 Server 
  • Mac®-based attendees: Required: Mac OS® X 10.6 or newer 
  • Mobile attendees: Required: iPhone®, iPad®, Android™ phone or Android tablet

Helping Students Make Sense of Fair Use (Copyright Webinar Series ; 2)

posted Nov 12, 2013, 10:38 AM by Lars Hagelin

We are pleased to announce the second in the webinar series being offered jointly by ASERL, the Boston Library Consortium, CIC, the California Digital Library, the Greater Western Library Alliance, the Triangle Research Libraries Network, and the Washington Research Library Consortium! 

WEBINAR: Helping Students Make Sense of Fair Use 
Date: Wednesday, January 15, 2014 
Time: 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM EST 
Register via https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/737141314 
After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar. 

Program Description: 

U.S. Copyright Law grants a number of exclusive rights to copyright owners, but those rights have various limitations. One of those limitations, fair use, is both a blessing and a curse for educators. It’s a blessing because it gives us the right to use copyrighted materials without seeking permission from the copyright owner, but it can also be a curse due to misunderstandings and misinformation regarding fair use. Making matters worse is the circulation of various sets of classroom “guidelines” – on university and library websites – that have never been part of copyright legislation and are therefore, not legally binding. In fact, most classroom copyright guidelines are quite restrictive and, if followed to the letter, can erode and impair the educational mission of the University.

So if we’re confused about copyright, what about our students? How do we help them think critically about using copyrighted materials in their classroom assignments when we’re not even sure ourselves? This webinar will describe current fair use analysis and provide a framework to guide students in making sound decisions about using copyrighted material in their work.

Sue Kunda, Digital Scholarship Librarian for Oregon State University Libraries and Press, will be the lead presenter for this session.

System Requirements:
  • PC-based attendees: Required: Windows® 8, 7, Vista, XP or 2003 Server 
  • Mac®-based attendees: Required: Mac OS® X 10.6 or newer 
  • Mobile attendees: Required: iPhone®, iPad®, Android™ phone or Android tablet

An Open Letter in Observance of Open Access Week 2013

posted Oct 21, 2013, 6:42 AM by Lars Hagelin

The libraries of the Association of Southeastern Research Libraries (ASERL), the Boston Library Consortium (BLC), the Greater Western Library Alliance (GWLA), the Triangle Research Libraries Network (TRLN), and the Washington Research Library Consortium (WRLC) are pleased to kick-off the start of "Open Access Week 2013" with this Open Letter to our members, colleagues, and friends. Together we represent 62 research libraries across much of the US. It is our pleasure to work together to support the development of open access publishing models and the fair use of copyrighted content.

To support our members' ongoing interests in these areas, we are sponsoring a series of jointly-hosted webinars to explore and describe the current world of copyright, fair use, and open access. The first session will be "Copyright and Fair Use 101," hosted by ASERL and TRLN on November 13, 2013. These sessions are free and open to the public. Details can be found at http://bit.ly/1fFKVNu

Additional webinars hosted by other research library consortia are under development. Information about future webinars will be posted on each of our organizations' websites as it becomes available.

On behalf of our colleagues, our thanks for your consideration of our Open Letter, and for supporting Open Access Week 2013.

Joni Blake, Executive Director
Greater Western Library Alliance
joni@gwla.org

John Burger, Executive Director
Association of Southeastern Research Libraries
jburger@aserl.org

Susan Stearns, Executive Director
Boston Library Consortium
sstearns@blc.org

Mona Couts, Executive Director
Triangle Research Libraries Network
mona@trln.org

Mark Jacobs, Executive Director
Washington Research Library Consortium
jacobs@wrlc.org

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[Text of PDF]:

An Open Letter in Observance of Open Access Week 2013

October 18, 2013

To our members, colleagues, and friends:

The libraries of the Association of Southeastern Research Libraries, the Boston Library Consortium, the Greater Western Library Alliance, the Triangle Research Libraries Network, and the Washington Research Library Consortium, collectively representing 62 research libraries, believe it is crucial that our libraries and universities, and the faculty and students they serve, have access to balanced information about open access publishing, the fair use of copyrighted materials, and emerging forms of scholarly communication. We believe that it is vital that content creators, content users, and libraries work together to find common ground to ensure that copyright "promote[s] progress in science and the useful arts" while at the same time providing reasonable compensation for the intellectual efforts expended to create that content.

We affirm that the principles of fair use are necessary to education and scholarship and that those principles provide a critical balance to the needs of rights holders.  As advocates for effective library services, our members engage with faculty, students, and researchers to ensure they understand these principles and have ready access to the content they need.

Many libraries use the services of the Copyright Clearance Center (CCC) to manage payment of copyright royalties.  While the CCC is a useful tool, we want our members to be aware that, although founded in 1978 as a non-profit tax exempt organization, CCC was stripped of its federal tax exempt designation in 1982. The U.S. Tax Court ruled the CCC had no "interests of any substance beyond the creation of a device to protect their copyright ownership and collect license fees."   We believe the CCC's continued marketing of itself today as "founded as a nonprofit organization" ignores the loss of its federal tax exempt status thirty years ago and is misleading as to its current business model.

Moreover, the CCC is financially supporting a large portion of the lawsuit against our colleagues at Georgia State University, which our organizations find wholly objectionable.  Our organizations are also dismayed at the recent marketing campaign by the CCC in the Chronicle of Higher Education, including links to "educational videos" available from CCC's website which we believe provide incomplete and inaccurate information about the balance of copyright and fair use.  We believe the CCC's business model and its support of litigation against common library practices prevent it from providing impartial information about copyright and fair use.  We urge our members to consider the CCC's business model and practices when deciding on a method for managing copyright payments in the future.

In observance of Open Access Week 2013 and our longstanding support for open access and fair use, our organizations are partnering to create a series of webinars for our members that will examine the rapidly-evolving nature of intellectual property.  Our goal is to ensure our librarians, faculty and staffs are well-informed on the rights and responsibilities of open access, copyright, and fair use. These webinars will be freely available to our members, starting with "Copyright and Fair Use 101" on November 13- see www.aserl.org for more information.  Additional webinars focusing on various facets of copyright, fair use, open access, and their impacts on library services will be scheduled for the remainder of the 2013-14 academic year.

We join colleagues around the world in celebrating Open Access Week!  With our thanks for your support of our programming,

John Burger, Executive Director
Association of Southeastern Research Libraries
jburger@aserl.org

Susan Stearns, Executive Director
Boston Library Consortium
sstearns@blc.org

Joni Blake, Executive Director
Greater Western Library Alliance
joni@gwla.org

Mona Couts, Executive Director
Triangle Research Libraries Network
mona@trln.org

Mark Jacobs, Executive Director
Washington Research Library Consortium
jacobs@wrlc.org


About ASERL (www.aserl.org):   Founded in 1956, the Association of Southeastern Research Libraries (ASERL) serves 38 research institutions in 11 states.  ASERL operates numerous projects designed to foster a high standard of library excellence through inter-institutional resource sharing and other collaborative efforts.

About the BLC (www.blc.org):  The Boston Library Consortium, an association of 17 academic and research libraries located in Massachusetts, Connecticut, and New Hampshire, is dedicated to sharing human and information resources to advance the research and learning of its constituency.

About GWLA (www.gwla.org):  The Greater Western Library Alliance (GWLA) is a consortium of 33 research libraries collaborating across 17 central and western states. GWLA is a dynamic, effective, project-oriented consortium, nationally recognized as a leader in the transformation of scholarly communication, and a facilitator in the application of new information technologies.

About TRLN (www.trln.org):  Triangle Research Libraries Network (TRLN) is a collaborative organization of Duke University, North Carolina Central University, North Carolina State University, and The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the purpose of which is to marshal the financial, human, and information resources of their research libraries through cooperative efforts in order to create a rich and unparalleled knowledge environment that furthers the universities' teaching, research, and service missions.

About WRLC (www.wrlc.org):  The Washington Research Library Consortium (WRLC) was established in 1987 to support and enhance the library and information services of universities in the Washington, DC metropolitan area. Today, the WRLC enables the success of learning and scholarship among its nine partner universities by creating coordinated collections, creating a robust infrastructure for discovery and access, ensuring the long-term preservation of physical and digital information resources and sharing expertise.

Call for Digital Poster Sessions and Roundtable Discussion Leaders: GWLA’s Symposium on Libraries Partnering for Student Learning

posted Sep 27, 2013, 6:27 AM by Joni Blake


Has your library taken a unique, creative, or particularly proactive approach to integrating and assessing student learning outcomes relating to information literacy? Consider submitting a proposal for a digital poster or roundtable discussion at the Symposium on Libraries Partnering for  Student Learning: Leadership, Practices & Culture at:

Digital posters present content on a single page or slide, but do not have to be printed or physically displayed (rather they will be projected on big-screen monitors during the conference reception). Digital posters can be made using PowerPoint, Prezi, or any other software allowing you to create a visual image which can be displayed on a single page. A limited number of selected applicants will also be 
invited to give a 3-5 minute mini-presentations explaining their poster projects during the conference reception on Thursday, November 14th. Please indicate on your submission form whether you or someone from your institution will be available to present your poster at the conference. You may still submit a proposal if you wish to have your poster displayed, but cannot be present to present it.
Roundtable discussion proposals should address at least one of the themes outlined below.
To apply, please submit a 150 word abstract by MONDAY, OCTOBER 7TH, 2013.  Please follow this link to submit:
Your poster or roundtable proposal and abstract should highlight your library's assessment efforts related 
to one or more of the following content areas:
• Proactivity: What strategies has your library employed to integrate information literacy learning outcomes at the program level?
• Scaling Assessment: How has your library designed and implemented program-level assessments for measuring information literacy learning?
• A Place at the Table: What strategies has your library employed to ensure that librarians are involved in discussions about student learning and curriculum?
 Impact: How has your library used data to demonstrate impact on student success?
Selected proposals will be notified of acceptance by October 14, 2013.

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